July-August Schedule of Health and Wellness Classes

Balance in Action – Mondays/Fridays at 1:00 pm

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84191900465

Meeting ID: 841 9190 0465

Yoga in Action – Tuesdays/Thursdays at 5:00 pm:

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81749823374

Meeting ID: 817 4982 3374

Pilates – Wednesdays at 1:00 pm

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/545290786

Meeting ID: 545 290 786

*No charge

**$40 unlimited classes of Yoga/Pilates in July-August – check, cash, CC or Venmo (Ann-Newstead) accepted

Updates April Schedule 2020

In light of the current stay at home recommendations, we now are offering various opportunities for you to keep active while you are staying at home. Scroll down for class schedule and the zoom login.

1) Telehealth through Patient Direct Access to a Physical Therapist for new or existing patients. 

OR E-Visits if you are a current patient with Medicare, or if you are someone who needs immediate care (severe pain or dizziness).

If you have a question or clarification about your current program…

please call for a 15- to 30-minute Discovery Consultation session with Dr. Ann Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD.

2) Face-to-face Physical Therapy if you are Covid-19 symptom free and not at high risk. 

3) One-on-one Pilates sessions virtually with Ann (text or call for more information).

4) On-line face-to-face free virtual classes – Balance, Yoga and Pilates – please see below:

Please join us on-line (by phone or by computer) for as many activities as you can – virtually – no charge in April.

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No class is too difficult ~ we are here to help you through. We look forward to seeing you! Be safe. Namaste.

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*Mondays 1:00 pm: Balance in Action with Ann*

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/340140078

Meeting ID: 340 140 078

*Tuesdays 5:00 pm: Yoga with Kristen*

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/182673275

Meeting ID: 182 673 275

*Wednesdays 1:00 pm: Floor Pilates with Ann*
(note time change from 12 noon)

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/545290786

Meeting ID: 545 290 786

*Thursdays 5:00 pm: Yoga with Courtney*

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/182673275

Meeting ID: 182 673 275

*Fridays 1:00 pm: Balance in Action with Ann*

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/340140078

Meeting ID: 340 140 078

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Links to Join Your Zoom Virtual Class Sessions (through April*): See above. Beginning in May you may need a password – text AhnewPT@gmail.com if you have difficulties getting online.

Click the link, enter ZOOM meeting ID for the class and check your video and sound.

Best Health Always,
Ann

Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD

AHNew Physical Therapy, PLLC

ahnewPT@gmail.com
210-833-8336 (cell)
210-372-1271 (fax)

Vertigo Is Not Normal

Vertigo is not a normal part of life…Start your day AHNew.

Are you dizzy? Have vertigo? Imbalance or disequilibrium or unsteadiness? 

“As many as 35% of adults aged 40 years or older in the United States—approximately 69 million Americans—have experienced some form of vestibular dysfunction.”

What is Dizziness? Vertigo? Dizziness is defined as you feeling as if you are spinning; whereas vertigo is your world spinning around you.

Both dizziness and vertigo can result in imbalance or disequilibrium and result in stopping activities that you enjoy most.

You have both a peripheral and central vestibular system that help control eye movements and balance. 

Cardiac and/or neurological events can also mimic dizziness and vertigo. Many people are seen in Emergency Departments for such conditions. 

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is a small percentage of vertigo, followed by vestibular neuritis, endolymphatic hydrops or Meniere’s disease, Vestibular Migraine, Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), or psychogenic disorders.

Finding a diagnosis of why you have dizziness or vertigo can be complex. It’s important to learn and discover more about the potential causes and solutions to improving your.

If you would like to learn more about how to lessen the effects of dizziness or vertigo, join us for an informational workshop. 

Contact Dr. Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD at 210-833-8336.

Dr. Newstead is Certified in Vestibular Rehabilitation, Neurological and Geriatric Physical Therapy. She is a Certified Exercise Expert in Aging Adults.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Early detection is key.
Performing monthly breast examinations are highly recommended. Encourage your loved ones to have yearly mammograms. If in doubt, seek out medical attention! I learned from my sister who had Breast cancer at age 31. Don’t wait!

Can I perform exercise or physical activity after Breast Cancer?
The answer is a resounding “Yes”. Cancer risk factors decrease with each acute bout of exercise. The accumulation of 150 minutes of moderate exercise and/or physical activity each week is recommended. Structured exercise can also prevent other diseases such as diabetes, heart and respiratory diseases. Physical activity also helps with improved mood and well-being. In short, any and all activity counts for your lifelong health and wellness.

What kinds of exercise can I safely perform during medical therapy sessions?
For people who have cancer and are in the midst of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, exercise can prevent tissues and muscles from becoming stiff and weak after a lumpectomy or radical mastectomy movement is essential.

Gradually increase your activity. Listen to your body. Breathe. What’s important is to maintain your strength, endurance and flexibility plus quality of life. 

Strength: Strength training can keep your muscles in good shape to do your daily work, chores, and feeling good about your body.

Endurance: Aerobic activities, such as walking or cycling, can help keep your other joints moving freely so you have more energy for your favorite hobbies or for playing with your children or grandchildren.

Flexibility: Yoga can help with flexibility, balance, and strength so that you can put on your bra, tie your shoes and go to the grocery store or shopping. Yoga can also help with pain and stress management to get through your days and nights with better sleep hygiene. 

What about lymphedema after surgery?
If you have had breast cancer and surgery, some complications that may occur include lymphedema, loss of arm mobility, strength and function, depending on the extent of your surgery and stage. Early detection is important at stage 0, 1, 2 and before local spread stage 3, or metastases at stage 4.

Gentle active movement or physical activity helps reduce lymphedema (swelling of the involved arm), reduces stiffening of tissues including muscle and facia from the underlying bones and joints. You may need to seek and expert in lymphedema management. 

What is Cancer-Related Fatigue?
Short bouts of exercise and a walking program integrated into your daily routine (at times when you are less fatigued) can improve conditioning. In combination, nutrition, sleep hygiene and physical activity form the triad of recovery from breast cancer.

How can I minimize Pain?
Movement can reduce pain when performed in therapeutic amounts. Soft tissue mobility and strengthening in combination with gentle stretches may be helpful to reduce your pain.

Are individual or group sessions best for me?
After a diagnosis of breast cancer, exercise sessions under the supervision of an expert physical therapist is vital for your successful return to full functioning and quality of life. Having someone to support you can be fun!

Quality of life is the ultimate goal as you return to typical activities to get your life back after breast cancer. After my sister went through breast cancer at age 31, she came back with so much energy and passion for life. She is an inspiration to me and so many others. 

Contact Dr. Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD for more information or a complementary 30-minute Discovery Consultation Visit. A Healthy Life for All Ages!

Phone: 210-833-8336
Email: ahnewPT@gmail.com
FB: @ahnewphysicaltherapy
Web: https://www.ahnewphysicaltherapy.com/

7 things that may contribute your Dizziness and Disequilibrium

September is Fall Prevention Month!

7 things that may contribute your Dizziness and Balance

Are you living with dizziness or disequilibrium?  Do you have difficulty changing positions? Have you had a previous fall? What contributes to your vertigo?

  1. Changes in aging systems. Your visual, sensory and vestibular systems in combination with your muscles are important for staying upright in your world. All of these systems work together to minimize your dizziness or imbalance (e.g. disequilibrium). Working on your neck motion and eye coordination and scanning can improve your vision especially for driving! Standing with eyes open feet together holding a countertop can challenge your balance! Changing positions may create dizziness or light headedness or vertigo. Or when you move from sitting to standing you may feel light headed, you may have a drop in Blood Pressure. Or vertigo when your world moves around you and you feel off balance.
  2. Changes in strength that effect your balance and walking. Have you been told that you cannot improve your balance or decrease your dizziness?  Have you had difficulty with dizziness or balance for a few weeks, months, years?  Has your walking speed decreased? You do not need to live with reduced physical functioning. You can improve your strength, flexibility, endurance, and ultimately your eye-head coordination, dizziness and balance. Research strongly suggests that people in their 40’s begin to lose strength; even people in their 90’s can improve strength. Begin an strengthening and flexibility program gradually increasing under the supervision of your physical therapist.

  3. Too many Medications or Polypharmacy. Do you take more than ten (10) medications? Many medications interact and the effects are cumulative that can lead to dizziness, vertigo, imbalance or disequilibrium. Medications can also contribute to fatigue or weakness. If any of these are true, you need your medications reevaluated by your PT.

  4. Mood changes. Has your quality of life decreased because of your dizziness? Are you basically satisfied with your life? Is your mood out of sorts because you feel you cannot go out and be with friends or family? Call a friend or family member to say hello or volunteer to help someone or a cause.

  5. Fear of falling. Are you fearful of falling? Fear of falling may be a common frustration. Fear of falling is most common after one or more falls. Use of a device such as a cane or walker may provide you with some more confidence. If you don’t like the idea of a cane, dress it up! Show your personality!

  6. Home hazards. Is your home a fall hazard? Do you have lights in each room? Do you have handrails to hold in the bath? Keeping your home safe and free from hazards is important to avoid falls. If you have dizziness and difficulty scanning your environment, you have need to declutter. If you have disequilibrium, keeping areas in hallways and in your kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and living areas free of throw rugs to avoid trips and slips, may help you to avoid injury.

  7. Chronic falls – Two or more falls in the last year. Do you have medical problems that contribute to your dizziness or falls? (Cancer, diabetes, stroke, Parkinson’s?) If you have had two or more fall over the past year, you have a chronic fall problem. A fall is defined as “any change in body position resulting in contact with the ground or with another lower level” (REF) If you have low blood pressure, you may suddenly feel light-headed. Lightheadedness differs from dizziness in that you may ability to turn your head without vertigo.

Would you like to learn more about physical activity and exercises to improve your strength, balance and walking? There are exercises and physical activities that can improve your ability to decrease dizziness and disequilibrium.

Ask your physical therapist for a one-on-one evaluation, education and an individualized program just for YOU! Improve your quality of life!

BONUS

5 Top Activities and Exercises to improve your balance and walking and dizziness:

1. Eye-head coordination: turning your head side to side, in sitting focus on a target. Can be done in standing holding a firm surface.

2. Flexibility: daily ankle circles and ankle pumps, hamstring stretches

3. Strength training: 2 to 3 days per week standing toe and heel raises, lifting weights with good form for both arms and legs

4. Balance retraining: standing near a countertop holding with both hands, maintain upright posture feet together for 30 seconds

5. Walking: 30 minutes daily – use a heel toe smooth pattern and take longer steps. Use walking poles for improved confidence.

Every exercise bout, physical activity and walk counts – park a little further away from your destination! All activities are cumulative throughout your day.

If you would like to learn more, contact us for a Free Report and/or a Free One-On-One Discovery Consultation Visit to learn more, contact us today. 

ahnewPT@gmail.com or 1-210-833-8336

Reference: PREVENTING FALLS: A Guide to Implementing Effective Community-Based Fall Prevention Programs. CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2nd Edition. 2015.