PREVENT FALLS AND GET BACK IN BALANCE

September is Fall Prevention Month

 

More than 25% of people aged 65 years and older will fall each year. Falls are the most common cause of both traumatic brain injury and fractures in older adults and are the leading cause of unintentional death for this population.  In older adults, accidental falls are associated with low physical functioning, reduced postural and gait stability, slow righting and equilibrium responses and orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure).

 

A fall can be defined as an event that results in a person coming to rest inadvertently on the ground or floor or other lower level.  People often deny falling. 

 

The common causes of falls are vision and hearing changes, dizziness, lower-extremity muscle weakness, loss of flexibility, pain, functional deficits in proprioception (sensory changes), balance, and walking. Comorbidities such as vestibular disorders, stroke, head injury, peripheral neuropathy, Parkinson’s disease, Multiple sclerosis or dementia can lead to falls. Musculoskeletal disorders such as low back and neck pain and Cardiovascular conditions can lead to a fall.

 

Physical therapists play a vital role in all stages of fall prevention management by addressing strength, flexibility, endurance, balance and ambulation concerns.  As part of a health team, Physical therapists address negative effects of polypharmacy, incontinence and urgency (bowel and bladder), frailty, and the safety in home and community environments. 

 

The key is prevention. Are you concerned about falling or someone you know who has fallen?  Call today for a Discovery Visit with Dr. Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD at 210-833-8336

Are You or Someone You Care About at Increased Risk for Injurious or Fatal Falls?

Do you know someone who has dizziness, has vertigo, or who is out of balance?

Older people are at more risk for injurious or fatal falls. One in four people over 65 years of age fall. Falls result in more than 2.8 million injuries treated in emergency departments annually, including over 800,000 hospitalizations and more than 27,000 deaths. (NCOA 2019)

The cost of a fall can be devastating, not only hospital costs (over $70B by 2020), but also loss of mobility and independence. Falls can also lead to a downward spiral of further decline in ability to function in the home and community, mood changes, social isolation and lack of interactions with family and friends. A fall may leave your loved one fearful of falling and unable to perform the activities they enjoy most e.g. walking, hiking, dancing, shopping, or golfing, to name a few.

Falling is not an inevitable result of aging and can be prevented through evidence-based fall prevention programs, such as Otago, that is delivered by a trained expert.

Do you want to improve the quality of life of someone you care about? Join us at our next Otago Workshop:

Otago Exercise Program Workshop – FREE EVENT!
Saturday, August 10th, 2019
10:00 am – 11:00 am
Please RSVP by calling (210) 833-8336

What else can you do to improve your loved one’s balance and reduce falls?

  • Perform a safety check of the home environment by clearing out clutter, removing throw rugs and other trip hazards, and wearing proper fitting shoes
  • Review all medications for side effects
  • Encourage use of an appropriate assistive device such as a cane, a walking pole, or a walker
  • Support by attending group or individual exercise activity programs to build muscles (force, endurance and power), aerobics, flexibility, and balance training

For more information about a Discovery Consultation Visit, please call (210) 833-8336, or send us an email at: ahnewpt@gmail.com.

Dr. Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD
Certified Exercise Expert in Aging Adults (CEEAA)
Specialization in Geriatrics, Neurologic and Vestibular Rehabilitation

AHNew Physical Therapy
14418 Old Bandera Rd.
Old Town Helotes, TX 78023
(210) 833-8336

Walk for Life…AHNew Start For Spring

How to Start Walking Program for Your Health…And Keep Going –

March 2019 – Blog

It’s spring! It’s time to get out and enjoy the fresh air and sunshine. A walking program is a perfect way to get energized.

Don’t let knee or back pain hold you back – walking is a perfect way to keep moving.

How do you start? And how do you keep going?H


Select the best time of day. Find a friend or buddy who can walk with you and keep you both accountable. Take a few minutes to select your clothing, good walking shoes and don’t forget your water.

Select a pace that you can walk and talk at the same time. Add an easy warm up of 5 to 10 minutes of walking, followed by gentle stretches, works well. Increase the intensity of your walk by speeding the pace up just a little bit at a time. You can also increase your distance not more than a few minutes each session.

End with a cool down by slowing your pace, doing a few gentle stretches, and drinking some nice cool water and eat well-balanced nutritious snack – more on this next month!

Every step counts! Aim for 10,000 steps a day. We will be holding a free Informational Workshop on “How to Start a Walking Program” was Saturday, Walking Clinic at Helotes Fitness Park on March 30th at 8:30 and 11 am (near Parrigin and FM1560).

Enjoy your spring and start AHNew!

Vertigo Is Not Normal

Vertigo is not a normal part of life…Start your day AHNew.

Are you dizzy? Have vertigo? Imbalance or disequilibrium or unsteadiness? 

“As many as 35% of adults aged 40 years or older in the United States—approximately 69 million Americans—have experienced some form of vestibular dysfunction.”

What is Dizziness? Vertigo? Dizziness is defined as you feeling as if you are spinning; whereas vertigo is your world spinning around you.

Both dizziness and vertigo can result in imbalance or disequilibrium and result in stopping activities that you enjoy most.

You have both a peripheral and central vestibular system that help control eye movements and balance. 

Cardiac and/or neurological events can also mimic dizziness and vertigo. Many people are seen in Emergency Departments for such conditions. 

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is a small percentage of vertigo, followed by vestibular neuritis, endolymphatic hydrops or Meniere’s disease, Vestibular Migraine, Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), or psychogenic disorders.

Finding a diagnosis of why you have dizziness or vertigo can be complex. It’s important to learn and discover more about the potential causes and solutions to improving your.

If you would like to learn more about how to lessen the effects of dizziness or vertigo, join us for an informational workshop. 

Contact Dr. Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD at 210-833-8336.

Dr. Newstead is Certified in Vestibular Rehabilitation, Neurological and Geriatric Physical Therapy. She is a Certified Exercise Expert in Aging Adults.

February is Heart Month

Wear RED is Sunday, February 3rd – GO RED FOR WOMEN DAY!

AHNew Year – AHNew YOU! February is heart month and your heart is a muscle so let’s get moving!

WEAR RED is Sunday, February 3rd – it’s “Go Red For Women” Day!

Movement is golden for many reasons… Movement keeps our hearts healthy! Movement allows us to have energy to do the activities that we enjoy doing…such as walking, hiking, biking, dancing, golfing, and playing with our loved ones.

Below are some healthy heart tips for starting and sticking with a physical activity program:

1) Find an activity you enjoy! Do you prefer walking or running? Being indoors or outdoors?

2) Ask a friend or family member to join you. Another person or a group keeps you accountable!

3) Identify the best time of day to work out. Are you a morning or afternoon or evening person? When is your energy the best?

4) Start easy and gradually increase your intensity and duration. How much activity is good for you? You should be able to talk and perform your activity with moderate effort.

5) Warm up and cool down to prepare your muscles for activity – don’t stretch “cold” muscles – five to 10 minutes is about right. You may feel a little soreness the next day or two – termed delayed muscle onset of soreness.

6) Perform Strength training 2-3 times a week and Flexibility and Balance training most days of the week.

7) Last but not least Aerobics is essential for Heart Health – meaning every step counts. Cumulative activity throughout the day is acceptable! Walking, cycling, swimming, dancing. It’s heart month so pay attention to your heart muscle – do something for your heart health daily! You should be able to walk and talk ~ get your heart rate up to about 50-90% of your maximum heart rate. Read on…

How do I calculate training heart rate? [Click here] Start easy, gradually increase your activities day by day and week by week.

cumulative amount of moderate physical activity of 30 to 60 minutes throughout the day adds up fast. Moderate activity level where you can walk and talk while moving can keep you heart healthy. 

Wishing you much happiness and heart health for “AH New You”!

If you or a loved one would like more information contact Dr. Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD for a free 30-minute Discovery Consultation Visit at 210-833-8336. 

Best heart health always, xo

Ann

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Early detection is key.
Performing monthly breast examinations are highly recommended. Encourage your loved ones to have yearly mammograms. If in doubt, seek out medical attention! I learned from my sister who had Breast cancer at age 31. Don’t wait!

Can I perform exercise or physical activity after Breast Cancer?
The answer is a resounding “Yes”. Cancer risk factors decrease with each acute bout of exercise. The accumulation of 150 minutes of moderate exercise and/or physical activity each week is recommended. Structured exercise can also prevent other diseases such as diabetes, heart and respiratory diseases. Physical activity also helps with improved mood and well-being. In short, any and all activity counts for your lifelong health and wellness.

What kinds of exercise can I safely perform during medical therapy sessions?
For people who have cancer and are in the midst of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, exercise can prevent tissues and muscles from becoming stiff and weak after a lumpectomy or radical mastectomy movement is essential.

Gradually increase your activity. Listen to your body. Breathe. What’s important is to maintain your strength, endurance and flexibility plus quality of life. 

Strength: Strength training can keep your muscles in good shape to do your daily work, chores, and feeling good about your body.

Endurance: Aerobic activities, such as walking or cycling, can help keep your other joints moving freely so you have more energy for your favorite hobbies or for playing with your children or grandchildren.

Flexibility: Yoga can help with flexibility, balance, and strength so that you can put on your bra, tie your shoes and go to the grocery store or shopping. Yoga can also help with pain and stress management to get through your days and nights with better sleep hygiene. 

What about lymphedema after surgery?
If you have had breast cancer and surgery, some complications that may occur include lymphedema, loss of arm mobility, strength and function, depending on the extent of your surgery and stage. Early detection is important at stage 0, 1, 2 and before local spread stage 3, or metastases at stage 4.

Gentle active movement or physical activity helps reduce lymphedema (swelling of the involved arm), reduces stiffening of tissues including muscle and facia from the underlying bones and joints. You may need to seek and expert in lymphedema management. 

What is Cancer-Related Fatigue?
Short bouts of exercise and a walking program integrated into your daily routine (at times when you are less fatigued) can improve conditioning. In combination, nutrition, sleep hygiene and physical activity form the triad of recovery from breast cancer.

How can I minimize Pain?
Movement can reduce pain when performed in therapeutic amounts. Soft tissue mobility and strengthening in combination with gentle stretches may be helpful to reduce your pain.

Are individual or group sessions best for me?
After a diagnosis of breast cancer, exercise sessions under the supervision of an expert physical therapist is vital for your successful return to full functioning and quality of life. Having someone to support you can be fun!

Quality of life is the ultimate goal as you return to typical activities to get your life back after breast cancer. After my sister went through breast cancer at age 31, she came back with so much energy and passion for life. She is an inspiration to me and so many others. 

Contact Dr. Ann H. Newstead, PT, DPT, PhD for more information or a complementary 30-minute Discovery Consultation Visit. A Healthy Life for All Ages!

Phone: 210-833-8336
Email: ahnewPT@gmail.com
FB: @ahnewphysicaltherapy
Web: https://www.ahnewphysicaltherapy.com/